Gardening Statistics (2024)

These gardening statistics will open your eyes to how extensive this industry—and hobby—is.

As we move forward, gardening—especially home gardening—has become another American pastime. It’s a fruitful hobby that allows us to evolve and improve as we grow our very own flowers, vegetables, houseplants, and more.

If you’re curious and want to get started on cultivating your own plants, read the top 47 gardening statistics below. These will give you insights on what to grow, where to find supplies, and more!

47 Gardening Statistics and Facts

  1. The United States is one of the top 3 gardening countries in the world
  2. 72 million or 55% of American households were involved in some type of gardening activity in 2020
  3. 18.3 million new gardeners sprouted during the COVID-19 pandemic
  4. Adult Americans spent a total of $48 billion in 2018 on gardening and lawn equipment
  5. 35% of US households, or 67% of American adults, are growing edible plants
  6. 39.1 million American households engaged in vegetable gardening in 2020
  7. Tiny edible plants were trending in 2021
  8. The top 5 home-grown vegetables and fruits include tomatoes, cucumbers, sweet peppers, beans, and carrots
  9. Asparagus, beets, and radish were the least popular vegetables to grow in 2022
  10. The top 11 vegetables to grow in 2023 included tomatoes, beans, corn, and more
  11. In 2022, 8 in 10 young people believed gardening is “cool”
  12. More than 80% of gardeners believed they’d spend more on gardening in 2023 compared to previous years, and 50% actually did spend more!
  13. There were 28,706 male and female employed gardeners in the United States in 2023
  14. White gardeners dominated the population at 56.7%
  15. There were more females with gardens at home compared to men in 2023
  16. The average age of an American gardener is 41
  17. Most US gardeners can be found in the South, regardless of what kind of plants they care for
  18. The majority of food growers in the US are in the South
  19. In 2023, New York and Chicago were top bets when it came to cities to garden
  20. Gardeners had better luck in California in 2023, as they offered more jobs and higher pay
  21. In 2023, men preferred growing from seeds, while women preferred growing from actual plants
  22. Most gardeners, or 51.7%, came from suburban areas in the United States
  23. The majority of those who garden earn around $100,000 to $199,999 annually; those who earn more than $200,000 are the least likely people to garden
  24. Surprisingly, men were slightly more likely to spend on gardening compared to females in 2023
  25. Zoomers, or Gen Z, were the most likely of all generations to spend more money on gardening in 2023
  26. First-time gardeners were slightly more hesitant to spend more money compared to seasoned gardeners who’d been in the industry for two or more years
  27. Over 80% of new gardeners planned on spending more or the same amount on gardening in 2023
  28. More than 30% are expanding their gardens because they want more variety in their plants
  29. Home Depot is America’s go-to garden and plant supply store
  30. Gardeners prefer online learning from local garden centers and podcasts and webinars a lot more than other platforms
  31. YouTube was the most popular platform for gardeners to learn more about the craft in 2022
  32. 76% of 2022 gardeners felt successful
  33. Money, time, and space were some of the most popular gardening hindrances and challenges in 2022
  34. Almost 50% started gardening for their mental health amid the pandemic
  35. Over 55% of gardeners started gardening to create a beautiful space for themselves
  36. Gardeners who sell their plants can earn roughly $1 per square foot
  37. Working from home means gardening from home: there was a 39% increase in gardening when the pandemic started
  38. COVID-19 increased 48% of gardeners’ interest in the activity
  39. Gardening goods and tools’ online sales shot up by 8% globally during the COVID-19 pandemic
  40. The 2022 total nationwide spend on gardening was $2.5 billion
  41. Flowers are the most popular type of plant a gardener can grow, and vegetables are a close second
  42. An average home gardener would spend 5 hours a week tending to their garden
  43. An increasing number of Millennials show interest in cultivating cannabis
  44. Kids involved in gardening are more willing to eat their vegetables
  45. Studies suggest that gardening is effective at enhancing academic performance, physical activity, language, arts, and healthful eating habits
  46. The most hated gardening chore is weeding
  47. Garden gnomes are making a comeback

1. The United States is one of the top 3 gardening countries in the world

According to a recent online survey conducted by GfK, 34% of consumers in the United States reported engaging in gardening or yard work daily or weekly. In addition, 22% of respondents stated that they tend to their garden at least once a month.

The US also ranked among the top three nations in terms of the highest level of gardening frequency captured in the study. Specifically, 8% of respondents reported engaging in gardening every day or most days. (1)

2. 72 million or 55% of American households were involved in some type of gardening activity in 2020

In a study by Scotts Miracle-Gro and Wakefield in 2020, 55% of all US households were engaged in gardening activities, and another 20% planned to do so soon.

Based on this, we can deduce that 72 million gardening households were gardening at the time of this research, according to census data. (2) This also means that over 185 million people in the United States were enjoying the joys of gardening! (20)

3. 18.3 million new gardeners sprouted during the COVID-19 pandemic

The 2021 National Gardening Survey survey confirms that gardening participation was way up, with 18.3 million new gardeners documented from this national sample.

According to National Gardening Association Executive Director Dave Whitinger, “Taken together, the surveys paint a full picture of the current boom in gardening and an analysis of possible future trends. While the gardening industry can expect another strong year in 2021, as the nation emerges from the pandemic, there are clouds on the gardening horizon.” (8)

The 2022 Gardening Trends Report echoes this statement, too. They say that 75% of these new gardeners will keep on growing even post-pandemic. (15)

4. Adult Americans spent a total of $48 billion in 2018 on gardening and lawn equipment

The gardening market surpassed $100 billion in 2020 and is expected to experience steady growth. The global garden equipment and supplies market is predicted to reach nearly $130 billion by 2024. (5)

According to an article by the National Association of Landscape Professionals, Garden Research conducted a survey back in 2018 showing that American adults collectively invested a total of around $48 billion in 2018 just on gardening and lawn equipment and supplies! (22)

5. 35% of US households, or 67% of American adults, are growing edible plants

The National Library of Medicine shared that a study by the National Gardening Association revealed that 35% of American households in the US grew their own edible plants or food.

Per the article, “Gardening can not only encourage a more nutritious diet and increased physical activity but also has the potential to address food access and food security, especially when fresh produce may not be available or accessible due to cost and distance.” (17)

An article by Tips Bulletin, a website that focuses on providing tips, hacks, and DIY solutions for various aspects of home and garden care, cleaning, and organization, also zooms in on this phenomenon, stating that 67% of American adults started growing or are planning to grow edible plants in 2024. Apart from this, 42% have even already started growing their own produce! (18)

6. 39.1 million American households engaged in vegetable gardening in 2020

According to a study by Statista in collaboration with Garden Research, an impressive 39.1 million households in the United States engaged in vegetable gardening in 2020. (3)

This directly correlates with the COVID-19 pandemic, as millions were stuck at home with nothing to do. It was also challenging to go out and buy their own produce, so vegetable home gardening is one of the more accessible options.

7. Tiny edible plants were trending in 2021

In the 2021 Gardening Trends Report, they highlight the popularity of tiny plants, too. The smallest plants grow the fastest, and this is one of the main reasons behind the popularity of edible plants.

This category is packed full of many different kinds of edible plants, including the Micro Tom Tomato, the world’s tiniest plant! Mini bell peppers, Dwarf Yellow Crookneck squash, Baby Ball beets, Striped Guadeloupe eggplant, Tom Thumb peas, sprouts, and microgreens are other terrific options for fast-growing, tiny edible plants. (16)

8. The top 5 home-grown vegetables and fruits include tomatoes, cucumbers, sweet peppers, beans, and carrots

Tomatoes are, by far, the most popular home-grown food, with 85% of US gardeners cultivating it. This is followed by cucumbers, sweet peppers, beans, and carrots.

85%Tomatoes
47%Cucumbers
46%Sweet Peppers
39%Beans
34%Carrots

These statistics highlight the preference for vegetables that are easy to grow, versatile, and can be used in numerous dishes. (18)

9. Asparagus, beets, and radish were the least popular vegetables to grow in 2022

In 2022, tomatoes were the most popular produce grown by homeowners with a vegetable garden, with 86% choosing to grow them. In contrast, asparagus, radish, and beets were the least popular, each being grown by only around 10% of homeowners. (4)

10. The top 11 vegetables to grow in 2023 included tomatoes, beans, corn, and more

The Axiom Vegetable Study identified the 11 most desirable vegetables for 2023. These vegetables are easy to cultivate, provide excellent nutritional value, and are versatile in the kitchen.

The top 11 vegetables on the list included juicy and flavorful tomatoes, crisp and colorful peppers, protein-rich beans, nutrient-dense potatoes, sweet and crunchy carrots, golden and delicious corn, refreshing cucumbers, tender and savory squash, nutritious broccoli, succulent eggplants, and sweet and juicy melons. (7)

11. In 2022, 8 in 10 young people believed gardening is “cool”

Since the start of the pandemic, gardening has experienced a surge in popularity like never before.

According to the 2022 Garden Trends Report, a whopping 70% or 7 in 10 of the younger generation viewed gardening as a trendy and worthwhile activity, referring to it as something “cool.”

Whether it’s the satisfaction of growing your own produce, the mental health benefits of being outdoors, or simply the joy of nurturing plants, gardening has become an increasingly popular pastime for people of all ages and backgrounds. (15)

12. More than 80% of gardeners believed they’d spend more on gardening in 2023 compared to previous years, and 50% actually did spend more!

According to Axiom, over 80% of respondents planned to spend the same or more on gardening in 2023. Of those, 42.9% said they would spend around the same amount, while 38.3% were willing to spend more. (4)

Conversely, in an article by Greenhouse Grower, they say that 50% of gardeners actually spent more in 2023 compared to 2022. According to their article:

  • 52.7% of Gen Z and 53.5% of Gen Y respondents spent more money in 2023 vs. 2022.
  • 59% of Gen Z and 54% of Gen Y spent 50 to 100% more time in 2023 vs. 2022.

Greenhouse Growers’ respondents also believe they’ll be spending even more money in 2024! They say:

  • 54.3% of Gen Z and 56.4% of Gen Y respondents expect to spend more time gardening in 2024.
  • 71.2% of Gen Z and 76.2% of Gen Y respondents plan to plant more and expand their gardens in 2024. (21)

13. There were 28,706 male and female employed gardeners in the United States in 2023

According to Zippia’s 2023 statistics, the number of gardeners currently employed in the United States is 28,706. Out of this figure, 56.4% were male gardeners. (6)

14. White gardeners dominated the population at 56.7%

Zippia’s 2023 post concluded that most gardeners in the United States belonged to the White ethnicity, constituting 56.7% of the total gardening population.

Hispanic or Latino gardeners were second, making up 28.0%. Black or African American gardeners represented a smaller percentage of the gardening population at 7.8%. Asians were significantly lower, at just 1.8%. (6)

15. There were more females with gardens at home compared to men in 2023

According to the data presented in Axiom’s 2023 release, it has been observed that home gardens are more prevalent among females, with 52.9% of them having their own gardens. On the other hand, only 47.1% of males have home gardens. (4)

16. The average age of an American gardener is 41

Recent statistics show that 53% of American gardeners are above the age of 40, with the average age of a gardener being 41.

Additionally, it is worth noting that only around 20% of American gardeners are in their 20s and 30s. (6)

17. Most US gardeners can be found in the South, regardless of what kind of plants they care for

Gardening is a popular activity among Americans, with varying degrees of participation across different regions.

In the West, approximately 22.5% of the population engages in gardening. In the Midwest, this number drops slightly to 18%, while the Northeast sees about 20% of its residents gardening.

The South, on the other hand, boasts the highest rate of gardening, with 39.7% of the population participating. This figure is further divided into 12.4% from the southwest and 27.3% from the southeast, indicating a significant regional difference within the South. (4)

18. The majority of food growers in the US are in the South

A significant percentage of home food growers in the United States are in the Southern region.

As per an article from Tips Bulletin, 29% of all home food growers in the country are based in the South. This region has a diverse range of climates and soil types, making it ideal for growing a variety of crops at home. (18)

Northeast22%
West23%
Midwest26%
South29%

19. In 2023, New York and Chicago were top bets when it came to cities to garden

Recent statistical data from Zippia show that New York and Chicago are the two most preferred cities for gardeners to work in the United States. (6)

These cities are known for their bustling urban landscapes and diverse communities, making them ideal locations for gardening enthusiasts to showcase their skills and creativity.

20. Gardeners had better luck in California in 2023, as they offered more jobs and higher pay

If you’re looking for a job as a gardener in the United States, you might want to consider California, as, in the previous year, it had one of the largest numbers of open positions in this field.

Moreover, in 2023, California was known to offer one of the highest average salaries for gardeners in the country, making it a potentially attractive option for those seeking a career in this industry. (6)

21. In 2023, men preferred growing from seeds, while women preferred growing from actual plants

Axiom’s 2023 Vegetable Study sheds light on various gardening preferences and practices based on their gender.

Their report shows that male gardeners preferred growing their plants from seeds. In contrast, female gardeners were more inclined to purchase mature plants from stores. (7)

22. Most gardeners, or 51.7%, came from suburban areas in the United States

According to Axiom’s 2023 release, more than half, or 51.7%, of the people who garden at home belonged to suburban communities. In contrast, approximately one-fourth, or more or less 27%, came from urban areas, followed by rural areas with 14.8%, and small-town non-suburban regions with 5.6%. (4)

23. The majority of those who garden earn around $100,000 to $199,999 annually; those who earn more than $200,000 are the least likely people to garden

Gardening is a popular activity among those who earn between $100,000 to $199,999. Data shows that 26.4% of individuals in this income range are known to enjoy this activity.

On the other hand, the percentage of people earning more than $200,000 and engaging in gardening is noticeably lower, at just 6.4%. People in this income bracket are the least likely to pursue gardening as a hobby or passion project. (4)

24. Surprisingly, men were slightly more likely to spend on gardening compared to females in 2023

Per Axiom’s 2023 report, a larger number of male individuals planned to spend more money on gardening compared to females.

Among the male population, 42.8% planned to spend the same amount of money, while 44.1% were willing to increase their spending. Conversely, among females, 43% would spend the same amount, while only 32.2% were willing to increase their spending. (4)

25. Zoomers, or Gen Z, were the most likely of all generations to spend more money on gardening in 2023

Other recent studies show that Gen Z, the youngest generation of adults, was planning to spend the highest amount of money on gardening activities in the year 2023, as compared to all other age groups.

Millennials were at a close second, with Gen X and Boomers following closely after them. (4)

26. First-time gardeners were slightly more hesitant to spend more money compared to seasoned gardeners who’d been in the industry for two or more years

Individuals new to gardening tended to spend less money on gardening supplies, tools, and equipment when compared to those who had been practicing gardening as a hobby or profession for two or more years. (4)

Intimidation could be a massive factor in this, as people are scared and hesitant to invest or put in more money on something they’re not sure will be of benefit.

27. Over 80% of new gardeners planned on spending more or the same amount on gardening in 2023

41.5% of survey respondents expressed their desire to allocate more time towards gardening in the year 2023.

On the other hand, 46% of the participants preferred to maintain their current level of gardening engagement and did not intend to change their routine. (4)

28. More than 30% are expanding their gardens because they want more variety in their plants

A recent survey among gardening enthusiasts found that 33.8% of respondents wanted to expand their gardens to grow a broader range of plants. 

Interestingly, about 8.7% of those surveyed stated that they would consider expanding their gardens simply because they enjoy the act of growing things.

A small percentage of the population found gardening relaxing and considered it their main reason for pursuing the activity. (4)

29. Home Depot is America’s go-to garden and plant supply store

Home Depot was the most popular store for buying garden plants in 2022, with 29.3% of all respondents choosing it as their go-to spot. (4) This store has all sorts of goods a consumer can use; some can even consider it a one-stop shop. 

However, beyond 2022, Home Depot has maintained its crown as America’s go-to garden and plant supply store. This could be clearly seen in Axiom’s 2024 Gardening Outlook Survey. (26)

30. Gardeners prefer online learning from local garden centers and podcasts and webinars a lot more than other platforms

Axiom’s 2023 survey observed that 74.3% of gardeners relied on podcasts and webinars as their primary sources of information when learning about new plants.

On the other hand, 48.3% of gardeners turned to Google to learn about new plants. Interestingly, not even a single respondent, accounting for 0%, found influencers as a reliable source of information on new plant species. (4)

In their 2024 survey, however, there’s been a slight shift to this, with 28.3% leaning toward learning from local garden centers compared to 27.7% from websites and 22.2% from social media. (26)

31. YouTube was the most popular platform for gardeners to learn more about the craft in 2022

In Axiom’s 2023 release, in 2022, YouTube was the most preferred social media platform among gardeners when it came to learning about new plants and gardening supplies. A whopping majority of gardeners, accounting for 69%, preferred using YouTube for this purpose.

Facebook came in as a relatively close second option, with 21% of gardeners using it for the same purpose. Other social media platforms, such as Instagram, Pinterest, and Twitter, had significantly lower preference rates. (4)

32. 76% of 2022 gardeners felt successful

When asked about their gardening outcomes, 76% of respondents felt some sort of success in their gardening activities in 2022. Still, it’s an 8% drop from 2021. 

18% of respondents hoped for more and thought they could have done better. A small percentage, 4.8%, believed they failed big time! (4)

33. Money, time, and space were some of the most popular gardening hindrances and challenges in 2022

Over 60% attributed their gardening struggles to money and time in 2022. To be more specific, 37.% of respondents struggled with money and budget, while 26.8% thought time was their main problem.

Meanwhile, 18.4% attributed their failure to lack of space, and 10% thought it was because they were short of ideas. (4)

34. Almost 50% started gardening for their mental health amid the pandemic

According to the 2021 National Gardening survey, 49% of new gardeners started participating in garden-related activities because they thought it was beneficial for their mental health. 49% were also pushed to start because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The pandemic gave 43% of people more time to garden, thus upping the number of newcomers in the industry.

Meanwhile, 43% started gardening because they wanted to “beautify” their place, and another 42% started because they wanted to participate in a “positive, enjoyable, and personal” activity. (8)

35. Over 55% of gardeners started gardening to create a beautiful space for themselves

Axiom’s 2021 release shows that 55% of people gardened to create a beautiful space, and 43% gardened to grow food.

Surprisingly, 25% of gardeners did it for the exercise. (9)

36. Gardeners who sell their plants can earn roughly $1 per square foot

The National Gardening Association estimated that, on average, households in the US spend $70 on maintaining their food garden, which yields an average of $600 worth of produce.

This equates to roughly $1 per square foot, providing an average return on investment of $530 or 757% after the first year’s costs. 

In summary, households spent $70 on edible plants, and they made $600. This highlights the financial benefits of vegetable gardening, which is becoming increasingly popular as food prices rise. (2)

37. Working from home means gardening from home: there was a 39% increase in gardening when the pandemic started

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic took the world by storm, bringing it to a standstill. As a result, most organizations and businesses were forced to shift to remote work, and individuals were confined to their homes.

During this time, there was a significant rise in the number of people who turned to gardening as a way to keep themselves occupied. This led to a remarkable increase of 39% in the number of people who took up gardening as a hobby, a passion project, or a way to pass the time. (9)

38. COVID-19 increased 48% of gardeners’ interest in the activity

Axiom’s 2021 release states that the COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the gardening industry, with a noticeable increase in interest among 48% of gardeners. (9)

39. Gardening goods and tools’ online sales shot up by 8% globally during the COVID-19 pandemic

Due to lockdowns, the gardening industry saw an 8% increase in the overall revenue for plant and landscape items from January 2020 to July 2020 compared to the same period in 2019.

This included items such as pots, fertilizers, soil, and more. (10)

40. The 2022 total nationwide spend on gardening was $2.5 billion

The United States spent a whopping total of $2.5 billion on gardening! (11)

In 2022, the country’s average expenditure on lawn and garden supplies amounted to about $128 per consumer unit. (12)

41. Flowers are the most popular type of plant a gardener can grow, and vegetables are a close second

In Axiom’s 2024 Gardening Outlook Survey, it can be seen that of all plants cultivated by gardeners, 76% are flowers, 55% are vegetables, and 49.9% are houseplants. This means that most gardeners tend to focus on growing flowering plants and vegetables, while a significant proportion also prefer to keep houseplants. (26)

Gardening TypePercentage
Flowers76%
Vegetables55%
Houseplants49.9%

42. An average home gardener would spend 5 hours a week tending to their garden

The average home gardener typically spends five hours per week tending to their garden, including weeding, planting seeds, watering, and moving soil. (11)

43. An increasing number of Millennials show interest in cultivating cannabis

According to a survey, around 50% of people aged between 18 and 44 years old would “definitely” or “probably” grow cannabis if it were legal to do so.

However, only 1 in 8 people over 55 said they would do the same.

Interestingly, one-third of households that do not currently participate in any lawn and garden activities showed interest in growing marijuana, which could be a potential hidden factor contributing to the growth of the gardening industry. (8)

44. Kids involved in gardening are more willing to eat their vegetables

More and more research shows that when kids help grow fruits and vegetables, they are more likely to try and experiment with different kinds of produce in their meals.

According to Melissa Moore, “Allowing children to be involved in every step of the process will get them excited to taste the fruits—and vegetables—of their labor.” (25)

45. Studies suggest that gardening is effective at enhancing academic performance, physical activity, language, arts, and healthful eating habits

A study by Cornell University on garden-based learning shows that gardening significantly affects one’s academic performance and focus.

According to the report, “Third, fourth, and fifth-grade students that participated in school gardening activities scored significantly higher on science achievement tests compared to students that did not experience any garden-based learning activities. Elementary school and junior high school students gained more positive attitudes about environmental issues after participating in a school garden program.” (19)

46. The most hated gardening chore is weeding

According to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources, weeding is the most hated of all garden chores.

When one thinks of “weeding,” words like “endless,” “never-ending,” and “overwhelming” are common adjectives that are top-of-mind. Weeding also takes a lot of time and focus, making it a very tedious activity. (13)

In a 2022 article, Moowy, an online lawn equipment and materials shop, referred to weeding as “the most thankless of garden chores.” It’s because a gardener would spend countless hours weeding and cleaning out their garden, only for them to turn their back on it for a while, then look back to see that numerous weeds have already grown back. (23)

47. Garden gnomes are making a comeback

Atlas Ceramics has revealed that garden gnomes are the most popular garden trend in 2022. Despite being considered unfashionable and kitsch, these figurines are making a comeback. (14)

Then, per the Garden Media Group, garden gnomes were already included in the 2023 Garden Trends. However, they’ll be bigger than ever in 2024! They even warned gardeners and homeowners about a possible “gnome revolution.”

Garden gnomes are known to symbolize good luck, so no matter how creepy or weird they may look for you, maybe it’s time to welcome them into your home in 2024! (24)

Are You Ready to Expand Your Own Home Garden?

Gardening can be simple and complex at the same time. However, it’s also very fulfilling, especially if you grow tomatoes and other vegetables that you can actually consume.

Like most gardeners mentioned, online podcasts and YouTube videos can help you start your personalized gardening journey. Moreover, gardening tools are very accessible thanks to Home Depot and today’s online shopping! 

Don’t be intimidated by starting something new. Plants just need some tender loving care! With that, we hope this list of the top 47 gardening statistics and facts was able to encourage you to try your hand at gardening or maybe expand your home garden if you already have one!

References

  1. (n.d.). US ranks among top three countries for gardening “every day or most days” GfK global study shows that more than one-third of Americans garden either daily or weekly. GfK An NIQ Company. https://www.gfk.com/press/us-ranks-among-top-three-countries-for-gardening-every-day-or-most-days#:~:text=Australia%20has%20the%20highest%20level,levels%20of%20over%20one%2Dthird
  2. Brooks, E. (2023, January 27). Gardening Statistics – Demographics & Trends. Ode to Gardening. https://odetogardening.com/gardening-statistics/
  3. (2023, November 15). Vegetable gardening participation in the United States from 2010 to 2020. Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/716538/us-vegetable-gardening-participation/
  4. (2023). Axiom Market Insights: 2023 Gardening Outlook. chrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/https://axiomcom.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/12/Axiom-Market-Insights-2023-Gardening-Survey-Report.pdf
  5. (2023, December 1). Gardening sales value worldwide from 2015 to 2020, with a forecast up to 2024. Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/1220222/global-gardening-sales-value/
  6. (n.d.). GARDENER DEMOGRAPHICS AND STATISTICS IN THE US. Zippia. https://www.zippia.com/gardener-jobs/
  7. (2023). Axiom Market InsightsL 2023 Vegetable Garden Study. chrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/https://www.ampleharvest.org/downloads/GardenerSurvey/2023%20Axiom%20Vegetable-Study-20220112.pdf
  8. (2021, April 22). 2021 National Gardening Survey released. National Gardening Association. https://garden.org/newswire/view/dave/114/2021-National-Gardening-Survey-released/
  9. (2021). Axiom Marketing 2021 Gardening Insight Survey: Gardening in a COVID-19 World. https://axiomcom.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/Axiom-2021-Garden-Survery-Report-20201118.pdf
  10. San Fratello, D., Campbell, B., Secor, W., & Campbell, J. (2021). Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Gardening in the United States: Postpandemic Expectations. American Society for Horticultural Science 2021, 32(1), 32-38. https://doi.org/10.21273/HORTTECH04911-21
  11. Caballero, G. (2021, April 9). Home Gardening Statistics in the US. Green Pal. https://www.yourgreenpal.com/blog/home-gardening-statistics-in-the-us
  12. (2021, April 9). Average annual expenditure on lawn and garden supplies per consumer unit in the United States from 2007 to 2022. Statista. https://www.statista.com/statistics/305521/us-expenditure-on-lawn-and-garden-supplies/
  13. University of Nebraska-Lincoln (n.d.). Garden Chores, for Better or Worse. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources. https://ianrnews.unl.edu/garden-chores-better-or-worse
  14. (n.d.). Garden Trends Index 2022. Atlas Ceramics. https://www.atlasceramics.co.uk/garden-trends-index-2022/#:~:text=1%20%E2%80%93%20Garden%20Gnomes%2C%20garden%20trend%20score%20of%209.15%2F10%3A&text=The%20overall%20score%20for%20Garden,than%20the%20average%20score%2C%204.94
  15. (n.d.). Garden Trends Report 2022: From Crisis to Innovation. Garden Media. https://f.hubspotusercontent00.net/hubfs/165357/Trends%202022.pdf
  16. (n.d.). Garden Trends Report 2021: The Great Reset. Garden Media. https://f.hubspotusercontent00.net/hubfs/165357/2021%20Garden%20Trends%20Report%20-%20final.pdf
  17. Kegler, M. (2020, December 23). Home gardening and associations with fruit and vegetable intake and BMI. The National Library of Medicine. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10200511/
  18. Beck, A. (2024, January 4). 2024 Edition – How Many People Grow Their Own Food? Tips Bulletin. https://www.tipsbulletin.com/how-many-people-grow-their-own-food/
  19. Cornell University (n.d.). Cornell Garden-Based Learning. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. https://gardening.cals.cornell.edu/files/Highlights-from-Journal-Articles-1dol7pi.pdf
  20. On, H. (2023, February 24). Bigger Garden 2023 Research Report Shows that Gardening is More Popular than Ever. https://gardening.cals.cornell.edu/lessons/program-tools/benefits-and-research/key-findings/
  21. (2023, November 23). Good News for 2024: Consumer Focus on Gardening Likely to Continue Rising. Greenhouse Grower. https://www.greenhousegrower.com/management/good-news-for-2024-consumer-focus-on-gardening-likely-to-continue-rising/
  22. Wisniewski, N. (2018, October 2). Landscape Spending Sets Records. The Edge. https://blog.landscapeprofessionals.org/landscape-spending-sets-records/#:~:text=This%20year%2C%20American%20gardeners%20set,%24100%20over%20the%20previous%20year.
  23. (2022, September 30). Common garden weeds: Can I eat them? Moowy. https://moowy.co.uk/common-garden-weeds-can-i-eat-them/
  24. Langan, B. (2023, April 1). GROW! Marketing and Public Relations Tips Sneak Peek: GMG’s 2024 Garden Trends. Garden Media. https://grow.gardenmediagroup.com/sneak-peek-gmgs-2024-garden-trends#:~:text=Garden%20gnomes%20were%20trending%20in,of%20the%20lucky%20garden%20gnome.
  25. Moore, M. (2022, April 14). Kids in the Garden: A Nutritious and Fun Experience. Eat Right. https://www.eatright.org/food/planning/food-security-and-sustainability/kids-in-the-garden-nutritious-and-fun 
  26. Axiom (n.d.). Axiom Market Insights 2024 Gardening Outlook Survey. https://axiomcom.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/10/2024-Axiom-Gardening-Outlook-Survey.pdf

Related: Houseplant Statistics